Sound Bites: Young Baltimore Activist Wins Goldman Environmental Prize | America’s Wasteful Obsession With Bottled Water | Recipe: Spaghetti Aglio e Olio

Episode 188

We talk with Destiny Watford, a young activist from Baltimore who won the Goldman Prize, the world’s largest award recognizing grassroots environmental activists, for her work to stop plans to build the Fairfield incinerator – the nation’s largest incinerator – less than a mile away from her high school. (Photo courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize.) 2016_DestinyWatford_01 (1)

We talk with Destiny Watford, a young activist from Baltimore who won the Goldman Prize, the world’s largest award recognizing grassroots environmental activists, for her work to stop plans to build the Fairfield incinerator – the nation’s largest incinerator – less than a mile away from her high school. (Photo courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize.)

We host our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world. We begin the hour with an interview with Destiny Watford, a young activist from Baltimore who won the Goldman Prize, the world’s largest award recognizing grassroots environmental activists, for her work to stop plans to build the Fairfield incinerator – the nation’s largest incinerator – less than a mile away from her high school.

We examine America’s growing obsession with bottled water. With: Roberto Ferdman, journalist who covers food and economics for The Washington PostChristopher Hogan, IOM Vice President of Communications for the International Bottled Water Association; and Emily Wurth, Water Program Director for Food and Water Watch.

Sound Bites closes with a recipe for a simple and refreshing take on pasta: spaghetti aglio e olio, from culinary aficionado Sam Levin. 

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How Environmental Legislation Fared In The 2016 Maryland General Assembly | Pollinator Protection In MD | New Baltimore City Sustainability Plan | Recipe: Passover With Michael Twitty

Episode 187

By Aditya10103 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49297209

Pollinator Protection in Maryland is one of our Sound Bites segments this week. Photo courtesy of By Aditya10103 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49297209

On Sound Bites, we take a look at how agricultural and environmental legislation fared in the 2016 Maryland General Assembly, we learn how Maryland could become the first state to pass restrictions on consumer use of neonicotinoids, we hear about the new Baltimore city-wide sustainability plan, and get a Passover recipe.

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Fairfield Incinerator Permit Expires | Phosphorus Regulation In Maryland | Food Educator Jennifer Crisp

Episode 186

Farm_in_frederick_maryland via Valerie Williams on Wikimedia Commons

Maryland Department of Agriculture announced that some 82% of farm fields will not be impacted by new environmental regulations potentially limiting phosphorus application or the use of animal manure as a fertilizer. (Photo by Ellie Van Houtte from Washington, DC, USA, on Wiki Commons.)

On our newest episode of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin with a follow-up to previous episodes about the proposed Fairfield Incinerator in Curtis Bay. The permit for the project was ruled expired this month by the Maryland Department of the Environment. With: James Strong, Sub-District Director for United Steelworkers District 8; and Leah Kelly, attorney with the Environmental Integrity Project.

Then, we talk with Jeremy Cox, Business Reporter from Delmarva Now, about Maryland Department of Agriculture’s announcement earlier this month that, based on statewide soil test information, some 82% of farm fields will not be impacted by new environmental regulations potentially limiting phosphorus application or the use of animal manure as a fertilizer.

We close out the show with food educator and documentary producer Jennifer Crisp. Crisp joins us to talk about new projects focusing on food and education. She produced Giobbi, a documentary about  a chef who finally gets to meet her 89 year old mentor: Artist, chef, cookbook author, gardener and winemaker Edward Giobbi. Crisp also teaches a seed-to-table program in Baltimore City Public Schools.

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Sound Bites: Impact Of Sewage Pollution In Baltimore’s Harbor | Detroit Black Community Food Security Network | Recipe: Palestinian Easter Kaik With Dates

Episode 185

A_View_of_Baltimore_Harbor via Valerie Williams on Wikimedia Commons

We begin the hour with an update on the state of sewage pollution in the Baltimore Harbor. (Photo by Dr. Cirrelia Thaxton on Wiki Commons.)

For our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world.  We begin the hour with an update on the state of sewage pollution in the Baltimore Harbor. Baltimore’s Department of Public Works (DPW) estimated that 12.6 million gallons of wastewater were dumped into the harbor last month following a storm. With: David Flores, Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Blue Water Baltimore.

Then, we talk with Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network and founder of D-Town Farm, an urban farm in Detroit. We discuss racism in the food system and the food movement, as well as Yakini’s work for social justice, food equity, and food security for the people of Detroit.

We close out Sound Bites with a special Palestinian Easter Recipe. Laila El-Haddad, co-author of The Gaza Kitchen: A Palestinian Culinary Journey, shares a traditional Palestinian Easter recipe, kaik with dates.

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Institutional Food Procurement | SCOTUS and Chesapeake Bay | A Vegan Poem

Episode 184

via Valerie Williams on Wikimedia Commons

We look at the U.S. Supreme Court decision to decline to hear a challenge to the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Plan by the American Farm Bureau Federation. (Photo by Jyothis at Malayalam Wikipedia via Wikimedia Commons.)

On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the with a look at one of the key issues for systemic change in the sustainability of our food system: Institutional Food Procurement and Recommendations for Improvement. We look at a report with the same name written by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. With: Raychel Santo, Program Coordinator, Food Communities and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Then we turn to the Chesapeake Bay, with a look at the U.S. Supreme Court decision last week to decline to hear a challenge to the Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Plan, by the American Farm Bureau Federation. With: Darryl Fears, reporter for The Washington Post, where he covers the environment with a focus on the Chesapeake Bay and wildlife; Tim Wheeler, Managing Editor and Project Writer for Chesapeake Bay Journal; and Jon Mueller, Chesapeake Bay Foundation VP of litigation and lead person on that court case.

We close out the show with a poem, A Vegan Change of Heart, by the son of a farmer who speaks from his heart about his decision to stop eating animal products.

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Baltimore Ecosystem Study

Episode 183

Ecosystem Sound Bites

The Baltimore Ecosystem Study is a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem.

In our latest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we speak with participants from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a consortium of long-term research projects examining Baltimore’s ecosystem.

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Afroculinaria’s Michael Twitty | Building The Black Yield Institute For Black Food Sovereignty

Episode 182

We begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.

We begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow. (Photo Credit: Afroculinaria)

On our newest edition of Sound Bites – our series about our food and our world – we begin the hour with my conversation with Michael Twitty, culinary historian of African and African American foodways, blogger at Afroculinaria, and recent TED fellow.
We close the show with Eric Jackson, Servant-Director of theBlack Yield Institute, who tells us about Black food sovereignty. Black Yield Institute is an Action Network of Black people and entities that serve to catalyze action in the pursuit of Black food sovereignty in Black and poor Baltimore. The aim of Black Yield Institute is the pursuit of a united Black community in the process of building power through cooperative economics, social and cultural affirmation, political action and collective wellness practices.
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Backlash Against Chicken House Construction | Labor Conditions in Poultry Plants | Recipe: Catalina Byrd

Episode 181

Photo Credit: anjuli_ayer on Flickr

(Photo Credit: anjuli_ayer on Flickr)

On our newest episode of our series about our food and our world, Sound Bites, we continue our coverage of the community organizing happening on the Eastern Shore against expansion of the poultry industry. We will talk with Jeremy Cox, reporter for The Daily Times of Salisbury, about his recent article, “Backyard backlash: How Delmarva turned against poultry.”

Then we shine a light on the treatment of workers in the poultry industry, from an Oxfam report, Lives on the Line: The High Human Cost of Chicken. With Minor Sinclair, Director of the U.S. regional office of Oxfam America; and C. Shawn Boehringer, Chief Counsel of Maryland Legal Aid. Sinclair and Boehringer co-authored an article in last week’s Baltimore Sun, “Poultry processing, a thankless job.”

We close Sound Bites with a special recipe from media consultant and political strategist Catalina Byrd, who will be the featured artist and guest chef this Sunday, February 21 at NANCY by SNAC’s Sunday Breakfast with the Artists.

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United Nations Comments On Curtis Bay Incinerator | Salisbury Teacher On Protecting Perdue’s Chickens

Episode 180

incinerator
On our newest edition of Sound Bites, our series about our food and our world, we begin the hour with a look at the health implications of the proposed Curtis Bay Incinerator. With: Tim Whitehouse, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, former head of the Law and Policy Program at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation in Montreal, and former senior attorney at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C.; and Dr. Gwen DuBois, Secretary of the Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility Board of Directors, instructor in Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a member of the Public Health Committee of the Maryland State Medical Society.

Last week’s statement issued by United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent stated: “The highest polluting industrial facilities, across a range of sectors from farming, mining to manufacturing, are more likely to be situated in poor and minority neighbourhood, including those of people of African descent. For instance, we are concerned about the possible health risks to people of African descent on account of the incinerator project in Curtis Bay, Baltimore and the lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. African American communities are calling for environmental justice as they are concerned that they are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards impacting their health and standard of living.”

We close the show with a discussion with Jane Langrall Robinson, a middle-school teacher and animal advocate in Salisbury, Maryland, who caught our eye with her op-ed in the Baltimore Sun last month: Protecting Perdue’s chickens.

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“If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?”

Episode 179

eggplant

We speak with Kim Eckart, Seattle-based writer and associate editor at Yes! Magazine on her article called “If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?” for How to Create a Culture of Good Health, the Winter 2016 issue of YES! Magazine.

Then we talk to some of our young farmers as we listen back to a conversation from last spring with: Walker Marsh, Founder & Owner of The Flower Factory; Isabel Antreasian, Project Manager for Whitelock Community Farm; Sache Jones, Food Justice Consultant for Park Heights Community Health Alliance and Manager of the AFYA Community Teaching Garden in Park Heights; and Charlotte Keniston, Open Society Institute fellow working in partnership with Paul’s Place on community-led interventions to address food accessibility in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore.

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